Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

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AC101

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: MT155

This introductory financial accounting course presents accounting as an information system that produces summary financial statements, primarily for external users. Students study the forms of business Organization, recording and analyzing transactions, and financial statement preparation. Ethical situations will also be addressed.

AC102

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: AC101

A sequel to AC101, this financial accounting course continues the study of the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. The course includes a study of cash; inventories; property, plant, and equipment; intangible assets; current liabilities; corporations (including capital stock and dividends); long-term liabilities (bonds and notes); the statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Ethical situations will also be addressed.

AC207

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING I

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: AC102

This course presents accounting as a system of producing information for management decisionmaking. The course emphasizes the identification and interpretation of data for planning, controlling, and evaluating performance of a business and its components. Manufacturing cost systems, incremental analysis, and capital budgeting are covered in the context of business returns.

AC303

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: AC207

This intermediate accounting course is a continuation of the study of accounting theory and practice as it relates to current assets, including monetary assets, receivables, and inventories. There will also be examination of the standard-setting process, the accrual process, and preparation of financial statements. This course uses a rules-based approach to solve complex accounting problems with consideration of US and international standards. Ethical considerations will be addressed.

AC305

TAXATION

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Even yearPrerequisites: AC102 or consent of the Program Director

A study of the theory and principles of federal income taxation for individuals. The course reviews preparation of tax returns in accordance with the internal revenue code and other supplementary IRS rulings. Emphasis is given to real-life scenarios and cases. Students will prepare complex individual tax returns using a professional computer package.

AC306

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING II

(4 credit hours)

Spring or As NeededPrerequisites: AC207

A sequel to Accounting 207, this course continues the study of accounting as a system of producing information internal management use. This course includes a study of centralized and decentralized organizations, responsibility accounting, transfer pricing, differential analysis, cost allocation, activity-based costing, and cost management for just-in-time environments.

AC310

ADVANCED TOPICS IN TAXATION

(4 credit hours)

Spring or As NeededPrerequisites: AC305 and consent of the Program Director

Taxation of corporations, partnerships, and specific trusts. Students will practice preparation of various types of tax returns. There is coverage of tax regulations related to specific current topics in taxation and continued discussion on representation of clients before the Internal Revenue Service.

AC315

ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Odd YearPrerequisites: AC102 and CI101

A study of internal control systems, data processing concepts, and accounting procedures and controls. The course focuses on typical accounting information systems. Using professional software, students gain hands-on experience in financial planning and modeling.

AC320

FORENSIC ACCOUNTING

(4 credit hours)

Fall or As NeededPrerequisites: Consent of the Program Director & Junior standing

Emphasis on federal legislation related to fraud examinations. Topics include coverage of laws preserving the rights of individuals suspected of committing fraud, laws that govern civil and criminal prosecutions, the admittance of evidence, and the testimony of expert witnesses.

AC330

CRIMINAL TAX PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

(4 credit hours)

Spring or As NeededPrerequisites: AC305 and consent of the Program Director and Junior standing

This course studies federal criminal tax law and procedure, including the prosecution and defense of Title 18 and Title 26 criminal tax offenses, federal and local rules of criminal procedure, pre-trial practice, methods of proof, representation of witnesses, federal sentencing guidelines, and related civil considerations.

AC340

PRINCIPLES OF FRAUD INVESTIGATION I

(4 credit hours)

Winter or As NeededPrerequisites: Consent of the Program Director & Junior standing

An introductory course in fraud examination methodology covering skimming, cash larceny, billing schemes, check tampering, payroll schemes, fraudulent financial statements, interviewing witnesses and writing investigative reports.

AC345

PRINCIPLES OF FRAUD INVESTIGATION II

(4 credit hours)

Winter or As NeededPrerequisites: AC340, Consent of the Program Director & Junior standing

An intermediate course in fraud examination elaborating on topics which are introduced in AC340. Most examination will contain representative questions from the CFE (Certified Fraud Examiner) examination.

AC401

AUDITING THEORY

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Odd YearPrerequisites: AC102 & Junior standing

An examination of the accounting profession, professional ethics, auditors' legal responsibilities, and financial audits by external auditors. The course surveys the development of auditing standards: the generally accepted auditing standards and official pronouncements. Practical applications are presented as illustrative cases. The case coverage includes audit planning, internal control evaluation, substantive audits and audit reporting. Sarbanes-Oxley is also presented.

AC420

CURRENT TOPICS AND CASES IN FORENSIC ACCOUNTING

(4 credit hours)

Spring or As NeededPrerequisites: Consent of the Program Director & Junior standing

This course will cover applicable current issues in forensic accounting and review questions from the CFE (Certified Fraud Examiner) examination.

AR101

ELEMENTARY ARABIC

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---

An aural-oral approach to the Arabic language, pronunciation and fundamental grammatical principles introduced through drill in the basic language. Special emphasis is placed on skills of listening and speaking, followed by practice in reading and writing.

AR102

ELEMENTARY ARABIC II

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: AR101 or equivalent or consent of instructor

A continuation of AR101.

AR103

ELEMENTARY ARABIC III

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: AR102 or equivalent or consent of instructor

A continuation of AR102.

AR201

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: AR103 or equivalent or consent of instructor

A course for students who have completed one year of Arabic; review of grammar with emphasis on the irregular verbs and syntax; practice in reading, composition and conversation based on matter relating to the Middle Eastern countries.

AR202

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: AR201 or equivalent or consent of instructor

A continuation of AR201.

AR203

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC III

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: AR202 or equivalent or consent of instructor

A continuation of AR202.

AR310

SURVEY OF ARABIC LITERATURE: CLASSICAL PERIOD

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Junior standing

A study of pre-Islamic period to 1500 CE; the golden age of Arabic poetry; the rise of belletristic writings; prose style; folk literature; selected readings; narrative genres: sacred and profane.

BL101

INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123

An introductory science course covering the nature of science, the unity, diversity, and classification of life forms and the evolution of life. Activities include videos, lectures, discussions, and a term paper.

BL103

INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL BIOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: ---

Provides an understanding of the diversity of life on earth. The coure describes the basic concepts of life sciences such as order and organization in living organisms, cell structure & function, cell division, photosynthesis, pathways of cellular respiration, DNA-RNA-Protein paradigm, the human body, genes & heredity characteristics and evolution.

BL111

BIOLOGY OF THE CELL

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123 and MT123Corequisites: BL112

An exploration of the architecture of matter from the level of the atom through the level of the cell. The structure and bonding behavior of atoms and biological molecules, essentials of biochemistry, structure and functions of cell organelles, and the reproduction and differentiation of cells is emphasized.

BL112

BIOLOGY OF THE CELL: LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123 and MT123Corequisites: BL111

Demonstrations and experiments are performed which illustrate the principles of Biology 111. Also included are microscopy, field trips, videos, and a term paper.

BL121

BIOLOGY OF THE ORGANISM

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112Corequisites: BL122

The comparative anatomy and physiology of organisms is explored with the aim of understanding how life forms have evolved and how each life form is adapted to its respective niche. Emphasis is placed on plants and animals, selected aspects of human anatomy and physiology, and basic ecological principles.

BL122

BIOLOGY OF THE ORGANISM LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112Corequisites: BL121

Examination of the adaptive strategies of diverse organisms. Activities include field trips, experiments, videos, microscopy, dissections, use of anatomical models, and a term paper.

BL132

HUMAN HEALTH AND FITNESS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the important concepts of health and wellness so as to motivate students to improve their health and prevent disease. Students will explore many topics and the factors that will influence their health and wellness, so that we can make health literate decisions regarding living a healthier life. The course creates opportunities to help students explore factors that affect their mental and physical health, including immunity and exercise, the impact of high risk behaviors, diet and exercise.

BL140

BIOGEOGRAPHY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123

Natural history and evolution of planet earth. The geological structure of the earth tectonic plates will be discussed: how ocean floor and continents form, break apart and reform – and the physical sources of volcanoes and earthquakes. Interactions among the earth’s solid surface, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere will be covered; term paper included.

BL161

INTRODUCTORY EEG I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123 and MT123Corequisites: BL162

The first course of a series designed to educate students on methods of measurement, notation, and methodology in a clinical electroencephalography (EEG) laboratory. Essential mathematical concepts, responsibilities and ethics of laboratory technologists, instrumentation, and interpretation of data are discussed. In conjunction with BL162, this course introduces students to laboratory techniques essential for Neurotechnologists.

BL162

INTRODUCTORY EEG I LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123 and MT123Corequisites: BL161

Measuring technique is emphasized. Students practice and gain proficiency in the 10-20 system of electrode placement.

BL171

INTRODUCTORY EEG II

(2 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: BL161 and BL162Corequisites: BL172

A course designed to introduce students to the theory and science of electroneuro- diagnostics technology with an emphasis on safety, polarity, localization and types of electrodes, as well as optimal impedance of electrodes.

BL172

INTRODUCTORY EEG II LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: BL161 and BL162Corequisites: BL171

Electrode placement and measuring techniques are emphasized and students gain further proficiency in the 10-20 system of electrode placement.

BL173

INTRODUCTORY PSG

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL161 and BL162Corequisites: BL174

The history and overview of sleep medicine, ethics, roles, and professional behavior of sleep technologists are covered. Patient and equipment preparation procedures, monitoring techniques and documentation, therapeutic interventions, protocols for monitoring, intervention and scoring, cardiac event recognition and management (EKG), patient safety and emergency protocols are all discussed.

BL174

INTRODUCTORY PSG LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL161 and BL162Corequisites: BL173

Sleep pattern recognition, instrumentation, cardiac event recognition and management (EKG), practical sessions and other appropriate practicals to support BL173.

BL175

INTRODUCTORY IOM, EP AND NEUROTECHNOLOGY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL161 and BL162Corequisites: BL176

Analysis of the anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous system, sensory and motor pathways necessary for understanding the procedures and applications of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (IOM). Includes an introduction to the electronics and instrumentation for IOM hardware and software. Foundational concepts of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring and evoked potentials are covered.

BL176

INTRODUCTORY IOM, EP AND NEUROTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL161 and BL162Corequisites: BL175

Appropriate practical and technical sessions to illustrate and support concents described in BL175.

BL180

INTERNSHIP I

(2 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL161 and BL162

Practical experience in a hospital setting where students observe the practice and application of medical technology including observation of and participation in diagnostic procedures under the direct supervision of a qualified neurotechnologist.

BL201

GENETICS AND EVOLUTION

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN151 and MT155

Classical Mendelian genetics, modern molecular biology of DNA regulation, natural selection and evolutionary history are discussed. Special emphasis placed on human evolution. Activities include field trips, videos, and a term paper.

BL202

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL203

Investigation of the structure and function of the human body from cells, to tissues, organs, and organ systems. Integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous system are covered. Videos, computer software, and online resource, are used to illustrate basic concepts of anatomy and physiology. Term paper included.

BL203

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL202

The structure and function of the human body are explored through various activities including use of anatomical models, microscopy, demonstrations, experiments, and applicable dissections to illustrate and expand the topics of BL202.

BL204

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

(4 credit hours)

Spring/SummerPrerequisites: BL202 and BL203Corequisites: BL205

Endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immunity, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems are covered in this second part of Anatomy and Physiology sequence. Term paper included as part of course.

BL205

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Spring/SummerPrerequisites: BL202 and BL203Corequisites: BL204

The structure and function of the human body are explored through various activities including use of anatomical models, microscopy, demonstrations, experiments, and applicable dissections to illustrate and expand the topics of BL204.

BL210

MICROBIOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 and CH111 and CH112Corequisites: BL211

Biology of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa are covered. Pathogens, antiseptic and sterilization techniques, and medical applications are discussed. Term paper required.

BL211

MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 and CH111 and CH112Corequisites: BL210

Laboratory to accompany BL210 lecture. Safety, sterile technique, culture and identification of microorganisms is emphasized. Includes study of anaerobic pathogens.

BL214

HOLISTIC HEALTH

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: ---

Provides an exposure and working knowledge to the role of holistic health practices and integrative medicine. The course will introduce the terminology used to facilitate discussion with healthcare providers and integrate holistic health practices into the healthcare system. This course will enhance knowledge of holistic health protocols that can restore wellness for good health and when particular ailments demonstrate an imbalance in the body and lifestyle.

BL222

REPRODUCTION AND SEXUALITY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: Sophomore Standing

Reproductive strategies of diverse life forms are compared and contrasted with that of humans. The anatomy and physiology, neuroendocrinology, and development of the female and male reproductive systems, as well as human embryology, are emphasized. The biology of sex determination and sexual orientation and cultural factors that affect sexuality and gender roles are also considered. Special emphasis is placed on birth control methods, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, and new reproductive technologies. Term paper included.

BL223

NUTRITION

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: Sophomore Standing

An examination of the role of nutrition in human health and disease. Human digestion and metabolism as well as macronutrients and micronutrients are discussed with the goal of enabling the student to become a more sophisticated consumer and to practice preventive medicine through appropriate nutrition and lifestyle choices. Students learn how to evaluate their nutritional intake and improve their nutritional status so as to improve the quality of their lives. Nutrition assesment and term paper required.

BL227

BOTANY

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL228

An in-depth study of plant structure and function, survey of various phyla of the plant kingdom, and related evolutionary and environmental issues of botany are discussed. Term paper required.

BL228

BOTANY LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL227

Laboratory studies to complement BL227. Lab activities include microscopy, live and preserved specimens examination, and field trips.

BL230

ZOOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL231

Survey of the animal kingdom with focus on comparative anatomy and evolution. This course is based on phylogenetic overview of the animal kingdom, examining selected classes of invertebrates and vertebrates to elucidate the evolution of the major organ systems, especially digestive, excretory, reproductive, and nervous systems. Term paper included.

BL231

ZOOLOGY LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL230

Laboratory studies to correlate with BL231. Lab activities include microscopy and use of preserved animal specimens.

BL233

BRAIN HEALTH

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: Sophomore Standing

Structure and function of the human brain including details of sensory, motor, and integrative systems important for our perceptions and behavior are covered. The role of nutrition, exercise, and mediation or prayer in maintaining brain health is explored. Practical techniques to improve brain use to maximize the student’s long- term academic and professional potential are discussed. Term paper included.

BL251

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL252

This course covers the structural, functional, and genetic characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and selected viruses, macromolecular syntheses, regulation of gene expression, chromosome organization, and intracellular protein trafficking. The molecular basis of cellular ultrastructure, hormone action, signal transduction mechanisms, cell cycle control, proliferation, and differentiation will also be examined. Term paper included.

BL252

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122Corequisites: BL251

Experimental techniques of molecular biology and molecular genetics designed to accompany the lectures in BL251.

BL261

INTERMEDIATE EEG

(2 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: BL171 and BL172Corequisites: BL262

The student is provided with a foundation in the theory and practice of a medically oriented laboratory. Instrumentation, activation procedures, and chart abstracting are emphasized. Study of medical instrumentation and theory, including basics of analog and digital instrumentation, calibration, care and use of electrodes, electrical safety, activation procedures, artifacts, montages, and classification of wave activity. Emphasis in this course is on clinical correlations.

BL262

INTERMEDIATE EEG LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: BL261

Instrument operation, recognition of artifacts, and performance of medical monitoring are introduced in a laboratory setting. Emphasis is placed on performance of routine EEG. A continuation of EEG wave pattern recognition and interpretation and the relationship between pattern recognition and diagnostic technique.

BL263

INTERMEDIATE POLYSOMNOGRAPHY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL173 and BL174Corequisites: BL264

Discussions of clinical detection of sleep disorders and use of EEG technology in sleep labs. Neural aspects of sleep pathways and the autonomic nervous system are also discussed.

BL264

INTERMEDIATE POLYSOMNOGRAPHY LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: BL263

Appropriate practicals to support BL263 including examples of various sleep disorders.

BL265

INTERMEDIATE IOM

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL175, BL176, BL341

Fundamental concepts in anesthesia basics and practical anesthesia are discussed. Basic pharmacology of sedatives, muscle relaxants, and other drugs and their respective effects on IOM. A wide array of IOM surgical cases are explored with further investigation into IOM hardware and software including program construction. Other topics include the surgical environment, HIPPA, JHACO, AORN, CPT billing and hospital coding protocol. Includes a laboratory component.

BL271

ADVANCED EEG

(2 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: BL261 and BL262

EEG pattern interpretations in disorders such as seizures, headaches, brain tumors, cerebral vascular lesions, encephalitis, psychiatric disorders, premature birth, brain abscess, coma, chorea, and drug intoxication are discussed in detail. Laboratory work is integrated with lecture.

BL273

ADVANCED POLYSOMNOGRAPHY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL263 and BL264

Scoring event recognition and management, instrumentation, multiple sleep latency testing (MSLT), multiple wake testing, abnormal and pediatric sleep is described. Students are taught in preparation for the RPSGT registry exam given by the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists.

BL275

ADVANCED IOM

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL265 and BL341

Theory and performance of procedure based monitoring plans used in Intraoperative Neuromonitoring. Trouble shooting and instrumentation setup, MEP, SEP, Free run and Triggered EMG for all spinal surgeries including minimally invasive techniques are considered SSEP, MEP, ABR and EEG for craniotomies and skull base procedures, cranial nerve EMG monitoring, SSEP and MEP brain mapping, documentation and legal issues are also discussed. Laboratory work is integrated with lecture.

BL279

SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT AND PROCESSES

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152 and sophomore standing

The course provides a survey of scientific landmarks in history and the essence of scientific thought and methodology are explored. In addition, physical, chemical, and biological theories and laws are discussed to help students better understand the scientific process and appreciate their place in the Cosmos.

BL280

INTERNSHIP II

(2 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL180

Practical experience in a hospital setting where students observe the practice and application of a medical technology including observation of and participation in diagnostic procedures under the direct supervision of a qualified technologist.

BL291

SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Completion of at least one 200-level Biology course

A literature research course that involves reading primary research papers in scientific and technical journals, assessment of experimental designs, and interpretation of data in these primary papers. Students present their findings in class presentations and a term paper is required.

BL321

ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL251/252

The course will provide an in depth study of different developmental diseases on a cellular level. Principles of cell biology and genetics of specific syndromes will be stressed. Specifically, the course will develop insight into the complexities of cell structure and function and the molecular events that mediate cellular processes, with a focus on cytoskeletal dynamics, metabolic processes, cell signaling and genetics. In this course, you will be provided with an understanding of the cytoskeleton, nuclear import/export, protein quality control, membrane trafficking and more. We will highlight how these processes contribute to the function of the whole organism and how their disruption can lead to disease.

BL329

SPECIAL TOPICS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Junior standing

A seminar style course covering research literature related to molecular biology. Students will present seminars related to specific research topics and lead discussions with peers related to the selected research. Term paper related to the research topic is required.

BL340

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: Junior standing

This course will prepare students for research by exploring topics that include the selection of appropriate project, formulation of hypotheses, and experimental design. Hands on research is included and term papers that are exceptional will be submitted for publication in research journals.

BL341

EVOKED POTENTIALS

(2 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BL175 and BL176Corequisites: BL265

Recording techniques and basic data recognition of visual, auditory, and somatosensory evoked potentials. Students perform evoked potentials according to the ACNS guidelines and are prepared for the ABRET registration exam in evoked potentials.

BL351

GENETICS

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL111 and BL112 or BL121 and BL122

This course deals with the traditional principles of Mendelian genetics, population and evolutionary genetics, and molecular genetics. Emphasis is placed on human genetic diseases and molecular biotechnology applications in the twenty- first century. Term paper required.

BL354

HISTOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Junior standing

This course will focus on the basic characteristics and identification of the primary vertebrate tissues, as well as their organization into organ systems. Where appropriate microanatomy will be integrated with organ functions. Examination of microscope slides, light micrographs, and electron micrographs of tissues and organs will be used in the study of vertebrate histology. Lecture and laboratory. Term paper required.

BL390

MOLECULAR RESEARCH METHODS AND LABORATORY TECHNIQUES

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL321 and BL322

A survey of modern molecular methods including those in nucleic acid, protein, and immunological areas. The course is designed to introduce methods to students that will allow them to apply modern biological laboratory techniques to research questions and clinical practice. Term paper included.

BL391

BIOSTATISTICS

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: MT221

Application of statistics in biological science with emphasis on quantitative analysis of data and statistical inferences. The course will cover probability theory and distributions, descriptive statistics for central tendency and dispersion, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for means, variances, and proportions, the chi-square statistic, categorical data analysis, linear correlation and regression model, as well as analysis of variance. Term paper required.

BL393

EPILEPSY AND LONG TERM MONITORING

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: BL271 or Consent of Instructor

Covers techniques of recording EEG with and without synchronous audio-video. Types of seizures, clinical manifestations, and pattern recognition are covered. Ambulatory EEG and pentobarbital coma, Wada testing, and awake cortical stimulation are also considered.

BL398

NEUROTECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE COURSE

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: BL343 or Consent of Instructor

A capstone course for the neurotechnology, polysomnography, and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring programs that will culminate in students integrating their understanding of neuroscience and EEG, PSG, or IOM. Students will review the research literature, write papers, and present seminars based on their theoretical and clinical knowledge.

BL402

NEUROSCIENCE I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: BL202 and BL203

A comprehensive examination of the human nervous system including study of the surface and cross-sectional anatomy of the spinal cord, brainstem, and cortex. Sensory, motor, and limbic pathways and their normal function and pathophysiology are described. Advanced topics in the scientific literature are researched by students and presented in oral and written format to further deepen their understanding of neuroscience. Term paper required.

BL403

NEUROSCIENCE II

(2 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: BL342

Sensory, motor, and limbic neural systems are examined in this course with clinical correlations of related neuropathology. Sensory organs and sensory processing as well as motor function and muscle physiology are considered along with higher cortical functions such as language. Term paper required.

BL411

ADVANCE GENETICS

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Junior standing

This course is designed for upper level undergraduate students, builds on Genetics, and emphasizes human medical genetics. Topics covered include but are not restricted to: known human genetic disorders, use of karyotyping, microsatellite analysis, and sequencing in the diagnosis of genetic disorders. Use of pedigrees, epidemiological and molecular studies in the identification of genetic contributions to multi-factorial conditions and diseases are also discussed. Term paper included.

BL413

IMMUNOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Junior standing

Cells and organs of immune system in health and disease are discussed. Topics covered include innate and adaptive immunity, molecular mechanisms of antibody diversity, major histocompatibility complex, complement system, immunodeficiency, allergies, immunology of cancer and organ transplantation. Recent developments in techniques and immunotherapies will also be discussed. Term paper required.

BL414

ENDOCRINOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Junior standing

The study of hormones and other signaling molecules and their functions in growth control, maintaining homeostasis, and reproduction. Term paper incorporated into course.

BL451

MOLECULAR PHYSIOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Junior standing

The emphasis is on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying physiological processes. Structure-function relationship will be addressed throughout the course. The primary goal of the course is to develop an understanding of the principles of the physiological processes at molecular and cellular levels. Term paper required.

BL493

READINGS IN BIOLOGY

(2 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Junior standing

A literature research course, which involves reading of primary research papers in scientific and technical journals, assessment of the experimental designs, and interpretation of the data in these primary papers. Students present their findings in class presentations; term paper included.

BL499

SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Senior standing

Capstone project for seniors in the Biology Program. Students explore a research topic in conjunction with faculty in the department who serves as project advisor. Students develop hypotheses and conduct experiments that are part of ongoing research efforts of biology department faculty. Students will present their research findings in oral and written format and as appropriate research findings are presented at local and national meetings as well as submitted for publication.

BS101

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ConsentCorequisites: EN151 & MT155

An examination and analysis of the basic structure and practices of the business community and their impact on economic, political and social institutions of the American society. This course will cover current business topics. Students will present in oral and written format throughout the course.

BS201

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: AC101

A fundamental approach to entrepreneurship and opening a small business. The course considers planning, capital procurement, profit analysis, regulatory requirements, management arts, and business plan requirements. A final project consisting of a detailed business plan will be required.

BS205

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: BS101

This course will assist students in developing the skills needed to communicate effectively in diverse work environments. The course will examine and practice essential skills for success in management. Emphasis is placed on research, organization, writing, and presentation of business communications. Topics integrated throughout the course include global communication, business ethics, and cultural differences in the business environment. Technological applications and ethical/cross-cultural considerations in the workplace are also discussed.

BS210

BUSINESS LAW

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: BS101

A study of the concepts, principles, and rules of law that apply to the practice of business in an everchanging world. This course includes legal and equitable principles related to business associations, partnerships and corporations. Students are exposed to the functions and responsibilities of how various business departments relate to a legal construct. A strong ethical responsibility is emphasized throughout the class. Other concepts include diversity, employment law, cyber law and privacy, Equal Employment Opportunity issues.

BS251

MANAGING GROWTH OF THE BUSINESS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: BS101

This course exposes students to the unique challenges of managing the growth of small businesses. It concentrates on company issues during implementation and growth phases, as well as long-term management considerations. The differences between small firms and large organizations, management needs, practices, and financial resources are examined.

BS271

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: BS201

Students will learn the necessary skills to create successful, high-value enterprises, with an emphasis on markets for technology and venture capital. Case studies will analyze current information and marketing technologies.

BS281

ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: BS201

The course focuses on the key marketing strategies relative to new venture initiation, as well as marketing decisions for small and growing organizations. In the course, students learn to apply marketing concepts and address special challenges and opportunities unique to entrepreneurial firms. The course will also address creative approaches to marketing communications.

BS301

ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BS201 & FN201

This course identifies and follows the wealth creation cycle beginning with company startups, successive stages of private equity financing, and ending with the harvesting of created wealth through a sale, merger, or initial public offering. Emphasis is placed adaption of financing and financial contracts for entrepreneurial firms. Topics also include information asymmetry problems, the high degree of uncertainty, and conflicts of interest associated with start-ups.

BS310

ADVANCED TOPICS IN BUSINESS LAW

(4 credit hours)

Spring or SummerPrerequisites: BS210

Current topics in Business Law are addressed with emphasis related to current events. A current example would be the role of the United States Supreme Court or laws related to diversity issues.

BS321

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: BS101 & Junior standing

An analysis of the international business environment and the role and behavior of multinational corporations in today’s ever-changing geopolitical landscape. The course considers the implications of sovereign states, economic blocks and world trade, monetary transactions, national cultural structures, political, social and ethical issues. Emphasis is placed on contemporary issues and related ethical considerations.

BS350

BUSINESS ETHICS

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: BS101 & Junior standing

A study of contemporary moral standards and their relationship to professional ethics in all areas of business and management. Ethical dilemmas will be presented with a focus on the idea that “Following the Rules is Sometimes Not Enough.” The case method will be utilized.

BS421

CURRENT TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: BS321

This course is designed to follow BS321. The course examines strategic management concepts as they relate to international business. The focus of this course will be on current events that affect the landscape of international business. This allows the student to apply his/her knowledge of international business to a particular region of the world with a strategic emphasis and to learn the impediments and opportunities for international commerce. The area of focus changes.

BS441

STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT AND POLICY

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: Senior standing

This course is the capstone course of the business administration curriculum. Emphasis is on implementation and control issues. This course uses case studies to reinforce the essential concepts of the business administration curriculum.

BS493

DIRECTED READINGS

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Consent of the Program Director

This course allows students to pursue study with a faculty member in an area not offered in the traditional business curriculum. It may be used to satisfy elective credit and may not be used as a substitute for a concentration course without the written permission of the Program Director.

BS494

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BUSINESS

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Consent of the Program Director

This course allows students to pursue independent study with a faculty member in an area not offered in the traditional business curriculum. It may be used to satisfy elective credit and may not be used as a substitute for a concentration course without the written permission of the Program Director.

CH101

INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: EN123 and MT123

An introductory chemistry course recommended for science majors. Fundamentals of chemistry and basic mathematical premise required for higher chemistry courses are covered. Topics include scientific measurements, mole concept, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry. Practical sessions included and term paper required.

CH111

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123 and MT123Corequisites: CH112

Basic concepts of atomic structure, the elements and periodic table, compound formation, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical equations, and the nature of chemical reactions. The student will learn analytical thinking and advance their problem solving skills. Term paper required.

CH112

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: Completion or placement out of EN123 and MT123Corequisites: CH111

Fundamental laboratory procedures involving glassware, weighing balances, and manipulations of materials are performed. Laboratory skills in observation and reporting are gained by hands-on experience.

CH151

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II |

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: CH111 and CH112Corequisites: CH152

A continuation of CH111 covering the study of solids, liquids, gases, solutions, acids, bases, and neutralization. Application of physical and chemical theory to inorganic chemistry including chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, solution theory, electrochemistry, as well as a brief introduction to the chemistry of carbon containing compounds with special emphasis on biological systems are covered. Term paper included.

CH152

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: CH111 and CH112Corequisites: CH151

Further development of laboratory techniques is emphasized; Use of modern laboratory instrument is introduced and qualitative analysis scheme, kinetic assays and equilibria are explored.

CH211

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CH151 and CH152Corequisites: CH212

Introduction to the chemistry of carbon containing compounds. The structure, nomenclature, types, and reactions of the groups of organic compounds are discussed. By building upon the concepts developed in previous chemistry courses, the student will understand the synthesis of organic compounds used in medicine, industry, and commerce. Term Paper included.

CH212

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Spring/SummerPrerequisites: CH151 and CH152Corequisites: CH211

The chemistry of living compounds is developed. Behavior, origins, and properties of the amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, and other compounds of life are covered. Special emphasis is given to enzymatic reactions.

CH261

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: CH211 and CH212Corequisites: CH262

A continuation of CH211 expanding on the chemistry of life: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, organization of molecules into membrane structures and other organelles. Special emphasis on metabolism and enzymatic reactions. Term Paper included.

CH262

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY

(2 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: CH211 and CH212Corequisites: CH261

Laboratory exercises to enhance knowledge of biomolecular structure and function. Concepts of chromatography, electrophoresis, centrifugation, and enzymatic characterizations are covered.

CH351

BIOCHEMISTRY

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: CH211 and CH212

Chemistry of life is explored: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, organization of molecules into membrane structures and other organelles. Course is a culmination of the chemistry curriculum as it relates to biology.

CI101

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---

This course is a general introduction to hardware and software as they apply to personal computers. It emphasizes the use of typical software packages including word-processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and web page design. In addition, students will be introduced to the concepts of operating systems, network, security, and privacy. Lab fee assessed.

CI105

WEB PAGE DESIGN

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI101

An introductory web design course that explains the fundamentals of how the Web works, including working knowledge of HTML. Topics include how to create page layouts, templates, and links, set font styles, create tables, align images, create rollovers, work with form objects, redefine HTML with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and integrate images. Lab fee assessed.

CI205

ADVANCED WEB PAGE DESIGN

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI105

This course is designed for students who are interested in web site development. The students will be introduced to basic principles of programming and client side script language. The course will use JavaScript to develop dynamic web pages. By the end of the class, the students will understand core JavaScript including language elements and client side JavaScript including objects that control the browser and its contents. Lab fee assessed.

CI213

DESKTOP SPREADSHEET APPLICATION

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: CI101

A spreadsheet application will be used in this course. Topics include formatting, formulas, functions, pivot table/chart, graphing and data analysis. Lab fee assessed.

CI215

JAVA I

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI101

This is an introductory course of JAVA programming. It covers control structures including selection and loops, methods, single-dimensional arrays, multidimensional arrays, and foundation of objects and classes. Lab fee assessed.

CI216

C# I

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI101

This is an introductory course of C#, an object-oriented programming language. It covers C# control structures, methods, object-oriented programming, and string. It is focused on building the foundation necessary to understand the capabilities of the C# programming language. Lab fee assessed.

CI220

CYBER ETHICS

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: Sophomore Standing

This course introduces the legal issues relating to the use of computers and the Internet. Topics being covered include privacy, professional ethics, freedom of speech, intellectual property in cyberspace, fair user and ethical hacking, trademarks, internet fraud, electronic evidence, and cybercrimes.

CI221

PYTHON I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI101

This is an introductory course of Python, an object-oriented programming language. It covers Python decision structures, repetition structures, functions, files, lists and tuples, and string. It is focused on building the foundation necessary to understand the capabilities of the Python programming language. Lab fee assessed.

CI245

JAVA II

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI215

This course is in continuation of CI215 and covers strings, Text I/O, class inheritance, polymorphism, abstract classes and interfaces. Lab fee assessed.

CI246

C# II

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI216

A continuation of CI216 covering the topics of arrays, event-driven programming, user interfaces, and inheritance. Lab fee assessed.

CI251

PYTHON II

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI221

A continuation of CI221 covering the topics of dictionaries, classes and objects, inheritance, recursion, and Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming. Lab fee assessed.

CI256

HTML5

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI101

An introductory web design course that explains the family of current and future document types and modules that reproduce, subset, and extend HTML. Topics include how to create syntax and document, create tables and forms, design page layouts, use graphics, video, local storage, color, images and tools, validate files, and use Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Lab fee assessed.

CI270

INTRODUCTION TO MOBILE DEVELOPMENT

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI256

An introductory course in developing applications on mobile platforms such as: iPad, Android, and Blackberry. The development platform will be jQuery Mobile that will use a touch optimized HTML5 UI to enable students to get a feel for the effort required in building applications on mobile devices. Lab fee assessed.

CI275

COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI101 and MT153

This course covers numeric representation logical gates, latches, adder design, architectural components, ALU, bus, I/O devices and processors, memory organization, instruction set design, tradeoffs addressing techniques, interconnection structures, CPU structures, parallel processing and computer architecture systems.

CI280

DATA ANALYSIS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI221

This course covers the fundamentals of data analysis by using Python. Topics include introduction of numpy and pandas, importing and processing data, cleaning and transformation of data, grouping and aggregation, data visualization, and time series and statistical modeling. Lab fee assessed.

CI301

DATA COMMUNICATIONS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI275

Introduction to data communication concepts and facilities with an emphasis on protocols and interface specifications. It will cover terminology, common carriers, modes, codes used, application, and concepts of electronic communication systems.

CI307

CYBER SECURITY

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI301

This course covers the basic concepts in computer security. Topics include privacy and personal information, computer crime, legal and ethical issues in computer security, identification and authentication, cryptography, operating system security, network security, World Wide Web security, and database security. Lab fee assessed.

CI309

FORENSICS AND INCIDENT REPONSE

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI307

Introduction to the topics of forensic fundamentals and technologies, digital evidence collection, and evidentiary reporting. Students will learn how to integrate these techniques into the incident response framework. Lab fee assessed.

CI310

PRINCIPLES OF DATABASE

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: Sophomore standing and consent of instructor

An introductory course to address the fundamentals of database modeling principles and the language provided by database management systems. Complete coverage of the relational model and an updated coverage of SQL plus an overview of network and hierarchical systems. Lab fee assessed.

CI320

DATA STRUCTURES

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI245

Introduction to data structures and algorithms. The topics include the lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, graphs, recursion and complexity analysis. Lab fee assessed.

CI321

COMPUTER OPERATING SYSTEMS

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI215, CI216, or CI221 and CI275

Introduction to operating system concepts, including system organization for uniprocessors and multiprocessors, scheduling algorithms, process management, deadlocks, paging and segmentation, files and protection, and process coordination and communication.

CI328

INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE AND BIG DATA

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI251

This course focuses on the fundamental topics in data science by using Python. Topics include data manipulation, simulation and static visualization, data analysis with statistics, machine learning, and methods for handling very large-scale data collections (Big Data). Lab fee assessed.

CI335

E-COMMERCE AND WEB I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI205

This course is designed for students who are interested in web-based e-commerce applications. Students will be introduced to the technology infrastructure that forms the foundation for all web, internet security, and encryption. By the end of the course, students will understand the different types of e-commerce, concepts of business and revenue model, web infrastructure, web sites, security and encryption, and payment systems.

CI340

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI251

This course covers concepts and applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI). A fundamental logical model, knowledge, reasoning, rules, and basic machine learning methods will be discussed. Lab fee assessed.

CI354

SQL SERVER DATABASE PROGRAMMING

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI310

This course covers Data Definition Language (DDL) and Data Manipulation Language (DML) to build database and retrieve data. Students will learn to create tables, update records, create simple and complex SQL queries, and create stored procedures and triggers. Lab fee assessed.

CI355

DATA WAREHOUSING

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI354

This course covers the fundamental concepts of data warehousing and its function in an organization. Students will be introduced to the concepts of designing business requirements, dimensional modeling.

CI356

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING IN JAVA

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI245

This course covers Object-Oriented Designing and Programming. It includes inheritance, static and dynamic binding, exception handling, event-driven programming, java collections framework, and multithreading. Lab fee assessed.

CI357

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Even yearPrerequisites: CI320

This course covers the fundamentals of software engineering. Topics include the concepts of software quality, design methodologies, process models, software testing and maintenance.

CI358

DATA WAREHOUSING AND BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE I

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI355

A continuation of CI355 covering the topics of master data management, designing and developing the Extract Translate and Load (ETL) System, Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) design, and familiarization with the Microsoft Data Warehousing/Business Toolkit. Lab fee assessed.

CI365

ASP.NET MVC WEB APPLICATION

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI246, CI256, and CI354

This course provides students with hands on experience creating dynamic web applications using ASP.NET MVC and C#, and working with Microsoft SQL server as database backend. Topics include Entity Framework, URL routing, creating web services, RESTful services, security, authentication and responsive design. Each student will build a web application project such as online game, chat, E-commerce, forum or wiki. Lab fee assessed.

CI415

DATA MINING

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Even yearPrerequisites: CI310

This course covers the concepts and the process of data mining. Students will understand knowledge such as clustering, classification, regression, decision tree and the methods to interpret the results.

CI420

ALGORITHMS

(4 credit hours)

Winter/Odd YearPrerequisites: CI320

This course introduces the design, behavior and analysis of computer algorithms and their relationship to the basic data structures. Searching, sorting and combinational algorithms are emphasized. Worst case and average bounds, on-time and space usage.

CI425

CLOUD COMPUTING

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI321

This course covers the various concepts, technologies, and architectures related to cloud computing. Topics include cloud characteristics, cloud delivery models (IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS), cloud deployment model (public clouds, community clouds, private clouds, and hybrid clouds), and cloud computing mechanisms.

CI428

ADVANCED DATA SCIENCE AND BIG DATA

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI328

A continuation of CI328 covering the topics of natural language processing (language detection and translation), data mining twitter, machine learning (classification, regression and clustering), deep learning, and big data with Hadoop and Spark. Lab fee assessed.

CI433

CRYPTOGRAPHY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Odd YearPrerequisites: CI275

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of cryptography. It covers conventional and public-key cryptography, authentication and digital signatures.

CI434

NETWORK SECURITY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Odd YearPrerequisites: CI301

This course provides an introduction to network security. Topics include firewalls, security auditing and assessment tools, Virtual Private Network (VPN) and Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS). Lab fee assessed.

CI435

E-COMMERCE AND WEB II

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI335

This course is designed for students who are interested in e-commerce. Students will be introduced to the business concepts and social-legal issues that surround the development of e-commerce and the real world e-commerce experience. By the end of course, students will understand e-commerce marketing concepts and communication, ethical, social, and political issues of e-commerce, retail, services, business-to-business, auctions, portal, social media, and digital online media.

CI455

MOBILE AND WEB USER EXPERIENCE

(8 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI365 and CI435

This course is designed for students who are interested in designing usable web sites for both mobile and computer. The students will be introduced to the usability engineering lifecycle. By the end of the course, students will understand how to design, develop, and evaluate web sites including guidelines, heuristic evaluation, and paper prototyping. Lab fee assessed.

CI456

BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE II

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI358

This course covers the concepts of business intelligence using the Microsoft SSRS toolkit with the following topics: BI architecture, design and development, deployment, security, usage monitoring, and operations and maintenance. Lab fee assessed.

CI457

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Odd YearPrerequisites: CI357

This course covers in detail the design and implementation of software systems using the waterfall life-cycle model. It covers the software testing strategies, designing test plans and test cases, design reviewing and inspections, required specification, and user manuals. Lab fee assessed.

CI492

SENIOR PROJECT

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor

Senior students present a practical project in any business field by using any programming language or website script language. Lab fee assessed.

CJ101

INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: EN152

The study of the evolution and contemporary operations of criminal justice agencies and how different parts of the system interrelate; major policy issues and problems facing the system from policing through probation and parole and the use of discretion.

CJ200

CRIMINOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CJ101

Examines the analysis, research design, problem-solving approaches, conceptualization, and implementation of various methodologies in the field of criminal justice, and applies these methods in a guided research project

CJ202

ADMINISTRATION OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CJ101

Justice administration in the United States including determinate sentencing laws and community policing and corrections; exploration of the roles and responsibilities of the police in society with special emphasis on leadership and community relations; legal, technical, and administrative topics in justice administration.

CJ203

ADMINISTRATION OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CJ101

Organization and administration of the juvenile justice system in the United States; a review of criminological theories, organizational decision-making, and a consideration of contemporary justice policies with specific attention to juveniles.

CJ205

ADMINISTRATION OF CORRECTIONS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CJ101

An overview and analysis of the United States correctional system: history, evolution, and philosophy of punishment and treatment; operation and administration in institutional and non-institutional setting; and issues in constitutional law.

CJ220

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CJ101

Overview of the development of law and legal institutions from historical, comparative and contemporary perspectives; legal issues associated with investigation of crime, collection of evidence, adjudication, sentencing and appellate rights.

CJ230

INTRODUCTION TO INVESTIGATION

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CJ101

Review and critique of methods used for constructing criminal acts using information derived from people, physical evidence and records; scientific, organizational and legal considerations in conducting such investigations.

CJ235

INTRODUCTION TO VICTIMIZATION

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CJ101

Surveys the historical development of victimology as a field of study. Analyses the victim-offender relationship, trends in crime victimization, and the identification of primary victimization data sources. Explores criminal justice reforms in victims’ advocacy at the local, state, and federal levels, including restorative influences.

CJ240

POLICE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CJ202

An exploration of the functions, management and organization of police and related investigative agencies, with special emphasis given to those on the local level; understanding the nature and experience of being a police officer.

CJ255

EXPLORING ETHICS IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CJ202

Examines ethical theories and their relevance to the criminal and juvenile justice systems, including the system of laws, enforcement, courts, corrections, probation, and parole. Considers the larger role ethics plays through application of normative ethical theories.

CJ260

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CJ202

The development of United States constitution al law and legal institutions from historical and contemporary perspectives; interrelationships o flaw, custom, morality and social change. The legal profession is also explored.

CJ270

CRISIS INTERVENTION AND DEVIANT BEHAVIOR

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CJ202 or PS330 or consent of instructor

The application of theories and multidisciplinary approaches to planning for crisis intervention for incidents which threaten the safety and security of both the public and individuals; causes and consequences of social deviancy and its impact on the individual, group and society.

CJ276

CRIMINAL PROFILING

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CJ270 or PS330 or consent of instructor

Examines theories of crime causation with respect to crimes committed by the most violent offenders in society. Identifies research done, and the history of Criminal Personality Profiling, beginning with the earliest explanations through the beliefs of modern science, as well as psychological and sociological explanations. Identifies various known offenders, examines their backgrounds, and explains how current research into homicide, sexual offenses and serial killers can provide clues to the identity of unknown offenders.

CJ300

DIGITAL CRIME

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CJ202 & CJ220

An introduction to computer crime and computer crime investigative techniques. Topics will include cybercrime, computer terminology, the history of computer crime, legal and social issues relating to computer crime, computer forensic science, and the hardware and software used to solve computer crimes.

CJ301

TERRORISM

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CJ202, CJ220, CJ260

An introduction to the complex issues surrounding terrorism and homeland security. The student is challenged to come to grips with the reality of terrorism and to be prepared to confront it as a criminal justice professional

CJ302

CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE/CRIME ANALYSIS

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CJ101, CJ200, CJ220

Reviews the applied research design and implementation process. Discusses the legal use, limits of intelligence collection and requirements for deleting information. Introduces crime analysis, pattern recognition, hypothesis testing, and strategic assessment of problem-solving initiatives.

CJ303

SPECIAL TOPICS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Sophomore Standing

Used to address any special issues addressing society as well as used for providing CPR certification / first aid certification as well as classes from (FEMA) federal emergency management. These classes allow for a number of certifications that will give students an edge for employment at state emergency management centers.

CJ400

CAPSTONE

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Senior standing

Integrates the concepts, issues, methodologies, policies and practices learned about the criminal justice system, subsystems, and processes. Culminates in the completion of a community-based action research project and formal presentation to community and professional partners. This course has been designated as a Writing Intensive course.

CJ401

CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Senior standing

Observation and participation in the work of a criminal justice agency, public or private; work is supervised by a faculty member as well as management personnel of the agency.

CJ494

CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: 12 hours in criminal justice and consent of instructor

Critical study of a select topic concerning specific aspects of criminal justice. Emphasis will be placed on the use of primary sources. May be repeated once for credit.

CP300

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I

(1 to 4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Sophomore standing

Students apply what they have learned in their academic programs to the workplace under the supervision of both the employer and the University. Cooperative education objectives are particularized in accordance with demands of the workplace and career needs of the student.

CP301

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION II

(1 to 4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: CP300

Continuation of CP300. The course requires students to assume greater responsibility and achieve more complex objectives than in the previous course.

DM/EN220

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL FILM

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---

Introduction to video production. Includes screenwriting, lighting, camera work, and video and sound editing. Final project an approximately five-minute film. Lab fee assessed.

DM/EN225

DESKTOP PUBLISHING

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI101

Principles and practices of gathering, evaluating, and presenting information for mass audiences, with attention to print and electronic media. Students will learn the latest publishing software. Lab fee assessed.

DM/EN290

DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI101

Focus on film editing. Particular emphasis on working with large audio and image files. Lab fee assessed.

DM/EN295

DIGITAL AUDIO PRODUCTION

(4 credit hours)

Summer/Odd YearPrerequisites: CI101

This course acquaints the student with the theory and techniques of sound recording as applied to film and video. Professional digital sound creation and editing software will be introduced. This course will also examine how the artist uses the techniques of multi-track sound recording principles to achieve the goal of integrating audio and visual imagery. Lab fee assessed.

DM180

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

(4 credit hours)

Summer/Even YearPrerequisites: ---

Theory and practice of digital photography. Focus on composition, lighting, and software enhancements. Lab fee assessed.

DM240

COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN I

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI101

This course will teach students to use Adobe Illustrator for graphic designs. The course concentrates on the application of design elements in graphic design. The topics are include drawing and composing illustrations, transforming and distorting object, creating and using patterns, applying different effects and creating 3D objects. Lab fee assessed.

DM245

COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN II

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: DM240

This course is the second course of graphic designs. The course is focused on complex designs. Using Adobe Illustrator, students learn to finish complex designs. Lab fee assessed..

DM260

DIGITAL IMAGING: PHOTOSHOP I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI101

This course introduces the most features of Adobe Photoshop. Student will learn how to work with layers, make selections, incorporate color techniques, painting tools, working with special layer functions, creating special effects with filters, adjusting colors, clipping masks, transforming type, liquefying an image, performing image surgery, and creating images for the Web. Lab fee assessed.

DM265

DIGITAL IMAGING: PHOTOSHOP II

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: DM260

This course is the second course of digital imaging. The course introduces advanced features of image processing. Using Adobe Photoshop software, students learn to perform complex image manipulations. Various image rotation, editing, and enhancement techniques will be covered. Lab fee assessed.

DM275

COMPUTER GAME DESIGN I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: CI101

This course takes students through the creative game-making process from theory to project completion. Students will use software to create a video game with everything from health meters to collision detection. Lab fee assessed.

DM285

ANIMATION FOR THE WEB I

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI101

This course introduces an animation tool for drawing objects, creating animated graphics and movies, adding sound/video and publishing animated movies for digital media and web. Lab fee assessed.

DM305

ANIMATION FOR THE WEB II

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: DM285

This course is the continuation of DM285, and introduces the students to advanced features of web animation. The course covers the latest techniques for creating cutting edge productions. Students will earn more advanced skills such as masking, transformation, distortion, motion techniques and character animations to create vivid movies for digital media and the web. Lab fee assessed.

DM320

DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION II

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Odd YearPrerequisites: DM290

This course is integrated of digital video and audio productions. It includes a comprehensive project using all the technologies covered in DM290. Final project an approximately twenty-minute film. Lab fee assessed.

DM325

VIDEO SPECIAL EFFECT DESIGN

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Even yearPrerequisites: DM290

The student will learn the tools of After Effects for compositing, animation and special effects that motion-graphics exports, visual effects artists, web designers and film and video professionals need. Students will practice and composite layers in various methods, apply and combine sophisticated visual and audio effects and animate both objects and effects. Lab fee assessed.

DM370

3D ANIMATION DESIGN

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: DM305

The course covers 3D animation designs, and incorporating the use of drawn, vector, and bitmapped formats as a means of generating animated sequences. Lab fee assessed.

DM377

COMPUTER GAME DESIGN II

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: DM275

This course is the second course of computer game design. Students will create complex and realistic landscapes, work with existing models and skins, design levels, assign character actions, and create lighting and shadow effects. This course offers the chance for students to immerse themselves in a 3D world. Lab fee assessed.

DM490

DIGITAL MEDIA PORTFOLIO PRODUCTION

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Senior level and DM240, DM260 and DM290

This course requires senior students to finish a comprehensive project using all the technologies covered in the previous courses. The project will include print and web design components.

DT103

FUNDAMENTALS OF DRONE TECNOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SummerPrerequisites: ---

Intro to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), and the technologies involved in their operation; Coverage includes UAV components, command and control (C2) communication systems, basics of flight, regulatory and regulations, safety and societal considerations; Components of UAVs. Basics of flight and flight control systems; Basic regulations applicable to UAV flight; Overview and background, definitions, history of UAVs classifications of UAVs, scale, lift generation method, and contemporary design consideration. Applications in military, government, civil, societal impact and agriculture. Operational considerations, liability, legal issues, insurance, and ethical implications Telemetry launch / recovery systems, ground control stations. Concepts of flight, aerodynamics, lift, weight, thrust drag; Flight performance, climbing vs gliding flight, range/ endurance, stability and control.

DT202

FUNDAMENTALS OF AVIATION ENGINEERING

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: PH220 and DT103

The fundamental concepts, and approaches of aerospace engineering, are highlighted through lectures on aeronautics, astronautics, and design. Atmosphere and Basic Aerodynamics Temperature, Pressure and Altitude, Density, Humidity, Absolute Humidity, Relative Humidity and the Dew Point, International Standard Atmosphere (ISA), Aerodynamics, Airfoils , Airfoil, Up wash and Downwash, turbulence, Stagnation Point and Stagnation Pressure Layer, Laminar and Turbulent, Flow Free and Relative Flow/ Wind, Angle of Attack, Angle of Incidence, Wing Area Shape of the Airfoil, Nomenclature, Thickness/Chord Ratio, Angle of Attack, The Wing Shape, Wing Span Aspect Ratio, Wind Loading Root Chord, Tip Chord, Swept Wing, Sweep Angle, Mean Aerodynamic Chord.

DT302

DRONE FABRICATION ENGINEERING

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: DT202 and ET300

Frame: engineering knowledge and knowledge of the materials such as metal (light), plastic, wood slats. Design of wooden frame, Motors: Ordinary quad, 4 motors design, Octocopter and eight motors design. The brushless motors – function of stator a d rotor; ESCs or electronic speed control: charge of delivering power to the motors. ESC and design based on Arms; Propellers: the propellers, and the frame of drone; Connectors: connectors and welding the motors and ESCs, connectors for the power distribution board. The power distribution; Batteries: battery and Li-Po batteries and their power differ. Battery monitor and proper usage. Mounting pad, Controller- RC receiver: Camera: USB key

DT303

DRONE FABRICATION ENGINEERING LAB

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: DT302

Drone schematics, Understanding the Architecture, calibration of test equipment’s: RF generator, Audio generator, RMS calibration, frame assembly, motor assembly, ESC calibration, control-system, Python interface, connector assembly, power calibration, Audio and video interface, USB key interface.

DT485

EMBEDDED TECHNOLOGY

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: DT302

Introduction to Embedded Systems and Microcontroller-Based Circuit Design, Instruction Set Architecture, Assembly Language Programming and General Purpose Digital I/O, Python interface using raspberry Pi, Debugging Software and Hardware, Threads, Tasks and Simple Scheduling, Threaded Program Design, Using Real-Time Operating Systems, Serial Communication Peripherals, Digital I/O Peripherals: T/C and PWM, Analog I/O Peripherals, Simulation Design and Debugging for drone

EC201

PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: EN151 or Consent of BHS or BS Program Director

A study of the theories of microeconomics including the relationship between supply and demand, price and production in perfectly competitive, monopolistic competitive and oligopoly, and monopolistic market structures. Emphasis and examples are related to current local, national, and international events which relate to microeconomic theory.

EC202

PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: EN151 or Consent of BHS or BS Program Director

A study of macroeconomic issues including factors of economic growth (productivity), unemployment and inflation. Government policy that attempts to balance economic, political and social considerations is examined with an emphasis on contemporary events.

EC311

COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: Consent of BHS or BS Program Director

A study of the historical development of economic theories of capitalism, fascism, socialism, and communism. The relationship between economic theory and current global macroeconomic issues is examined with small group discussion and presentation requirements. Current topics in the geopolitical world are covered as necessary.

EC431

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: EC202 & Senior standing

An examination of global economic considerations including trade issues and current trade treaties, international monetary policy, balance of payment issues and regional economic integration. Special emphasis is given to matters related to current economic events and how they affect both global and domestic economic policy.

EN/DM220

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL FILM

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---

Introduction to video production. Includes screenwriting, lighting, camera work, and video and sound editing. Final project is an approximately five minute film. Lab fee assessed.

EN/DM225

DESKTOP PUBLISHING

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI101 and EN152

Principles and practices of gathering, evaluating, and presenting information for mass audiences, with attention to print and electronic media. Students will learn the latest publishing software. Lab fee assessed.

EN/DM290

DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: CI101 or consent of instructor

Focus on film narration and editing. Particular emphasis on working with large audio and image files. Lab fee assessed.

EN/DM295

DIGITAL AUDIO PRODUCTION

(4 credit hours)

Summer/Odd YearPrerequisites: CI101 or consent of instructor

This course acquaints the student with the theory and techniques of sound recording as applied to film and video. Professional digital sound creation and editing software will be introduced. This course will also examine how the artist uses the techniques of multi-track sound recording principles to achieve the goal of integrating audio and visual imagery. Lab fee assessed.

EN081

ESL BASIC WRITING (ESL Writing 1)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Placement.

The course will help non-native speakers to write correct sentences and paragraphs in English. It will introduce the concepts of topic sentence, support and concluding sentence of a paragraph. By the end of the course students should be able to write short paragraphs about themselves, their families, their jobs, their experiences in America, etc.

EN082

ESL BASIC GRAMMAR (ESL Grammar 1)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Placement.

The course will help non-native speakers create formally correct simple sentences and understand the meanings of different verb and noun forms. By the end of the class students should be able to recognize and use correctly such verb forms as Simple Present, Past and Future and Progressive Present, Past and Future.

EN083

ESL BASIC SPEAKING/LISTENING (ESL Speaking/Listening 1)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Placement.

The course will help non-native speakers reduce their accent, practice talking in English with native speakers, make short presentations about themselves, their jobs, their hobbies, etc. The course will also involve listening to radio, TV and audiotapes.

EN084

ESL BASIC READING (ESL Reading 1)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Placement.

Non-native speakers will work on understanding printed texts in formal English, increase vocabulary, learn to read faster. Texts will include short narratives, poems, newspaper articles and other appropriate genres.

EN091

ESL INTERMEDIATE WRITING (ESL Writing 2)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of basic level or placement.

The course will help non-native speakers express their ideas in written English. Students will write a 5-paragraph narrative and practice developing memos, resumes, letters (e.g. a letter of complaint, a letter of recommendation, etc.). Students will also practice writing formal letters for academic and work-related purposes.

EN092

ESL INTERMEDIATE GRAMMAR (ESL Grammar 2)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of basic level or placement.

The course will help non-native speakers use and understand the meanings of most formal grammatical structures. By the end of the class students should be able to recognize and use correctly all verb forms and Conditional Infinitives, Modal Verbs for past events; attention will be given to academic patterns, such as the use of Passive. Emphasis on daily use in practical situations.

EN093

ESL INTERMEDIATE SPEAKING/LISTENING (ESL Speaking/Listening 2)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of basic level or placement.

The course will help non-native speakers reduce their accent, differentiate between similar sounding English words, make formal presentations on academic and cultural topics. The course will involve note-taking while listening to guest speakers and mass media. Conversation strategies will be discussed and practiced. Students will make presentations using PowerPoint and other media.

EN094

ESL INTERMEDIATE READING (ESL Reading 2)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of basic level or placement.

Non-native speakers will work on their vocabulary and reading strategies. Texts will cover specific academic areas, mass media and fiction. Students will practice textual analysis and discuss their readings. Some TOEFL-preparation strategies will be used.

EN095

ESL ADVANCED WRITING (ESL Writing 3)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of intermediate level or placement.

Non-native speakers will express their ideas in formal academic English. Students will learn about the conventions of work-related documents, such as cover letters and reports, and academic prose, such as essays. Students will write a short research paper using MLA and/or APA style of citation; look at the difference in style between newspaper articles, personal letters, fiction, creative nonfiction. Develop memo, further develop resume, cover letter. TOEFL-preparation strategies will be used. Upon completion students may transfer into college-level Rhetoric courses.

EN096

ESL ADVANCED GRAMMAR (ESL Grammar 3)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of intermediate level or placement.

Non-native speakers will use and understand the meanings of complex grammatical structures, such as Conditional and Complex Subject (e.g. “He is known to have published several books”), commonly used in formal English. The course will concentrate on real-life usage of formal structures, drawing examples from political speeches, respectable mass media outlets and academic lectures.

EN097

ESL ADVANCED SPEAKING/LISTENING (ESL Speaking/Listening 3)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of intermediate level or placement.

Non-native speakers will practice English intonation patterns, make formal presentations on academic and cultural topics, practice note-taking. Students will role-play work related and academic situations and use such conversation strategies as expressing disagreement, expressing support, changing subject, introducing examples, etc. The course will include watching and discussing video materials, listening to novels recorded by actors and listening to the news.

EN098

ESL ADVANCED READING (ESL Reading 3)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Completion of intermediate level or placement.

Non-native speakers will prepare to read complex academic, cultural and business materials. TOEFL reading strategies and exercises will be used. Students will also read and discuss a novel, some of the texts required in American high schools, and materials of current interest.

EN105

POETRY: COMPOSITION AND INTERPRETATION

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---

In this workshop course, students develop their craft by being exposed to and modeling best poets of all eras, from ancient to contemporary; students are expected to complete seven poems throughout the course. Classroom activities include responses to texts and imaginative exercises. Students study the power of rhythm, diction, imagery, irony, and organization. The course uses poetry as a tool for students to explore the potential of language and creation of an identity.

EN106

FUNDAMENTALS OF COMEDIC PERFORMANCE AND WRITING

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---

In this workshop course, students explore various forms of comedic performance such as stand-up, improvisation, and sketch, with opportunities for writing and performing. The course is useful for writers wishing to add to their toolbox. In addition, students will use critical thinking and analysis to evaluate comedy in terms of performance, writing styles, and unique ways of expression. The question “how and why do we use humor?” will be addressed.

EN125

COLLEGE PREPARATORY ENGLISH

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: Placement.

This reading and writing course is designed to improve students’ English skills to reach the level required for college work. Students improve vocabulary, strengthen reading comprehension, improve grammar, and build confidence in college level writing. Reading and writing are based on contemporary materials and topics relevant to students’ lives. Credits do not count towards graduation.

EN151

RHETORIC AND STYLE

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: EN125 or Placement.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the writing process, empowering them to effectively produce polished, coherent academic essays, which employ critical, analytical and research skills. This course applies a holistic approach to academic writing while helping students to develop clear, thoughtful essays in standard academic forms.

EN152

WRITING FROM SOURCES

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: EN151.

The second part of the required freshman writing sequence. Students read essays and books written for a general educated audience, paraphrase and summarize them, isolate premises and evaluate the evidence of arguments. Students incorporate their readings into original papers, and practice documenting their research.

EN153

HONORS ENGLISH

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Placement.

Students analyze outstanding literary and nonfiction texts, write documented research papers, and give talks based on their research papers. Students can take this course instead of the EN151/EN152 sequence.

EN154

TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

Organization and design of standard documents common to business, science and technology, letters, memos, reports and resumes. Emphasis is placed on audience, purpose and style.

EN155

INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Odd YearPrerequisites: EN151.

The course addresses the following issues: What is fake news? What is real news? How do ethics, honesty and bias weigh in when gathering and reporting news? What are the most effective ways of presenting and reporting news to the public? Students understand the changing role of journalism and learn the art of reporting and writing narrative stories. Readings include some of the best examples of modern journalism from a diverse range of authors and sources. Coursework includes news reports, features, narratives and interviews that are ready for publication. The students leave class with a mastery of basic journalism skills and a portfolio of their best pieces. The course culminates with an issue of Phantom Press, the campus newspaper.

EN156

ENGLISH TUTORING WORKSHOP

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

An introduction to tutoring. Course conducted as a practicum in the Writing Center, overseen by the head of tutoring. Emphasis is placed on interaction between tutor and client and strategies to help the client master written Standard English. Includes a review of mechanics and punctuation, written clarity, methods of research, standard documentation, and a survey of the types of writing demanded by different disciplines and addresses the different strategies required for English as a second language students and native speakers.

EN157

PRACTICAL RESEARCH WRITING

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: EN152

The third in the freshman composition sequence. Students pose questions and use research to help develop and justify answers. Students evaluate the quality and reliability of data found in different sources, and use critical thinking to draw inferences, generate ideas, and propose solutions to problems. Students learn about resources provided by professional organizations, and about scholarly journals in their major; students use research databases, produce an annotated bibliography using citation style appropriate to their major (APA, IEEE, MLA), a literature review, and at least one research paper.

EN160/CI105

WEB PAGE DESIGN

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: CI101

An introductory web design course that explains the fundamentals of how the web works, including working knowledge of HTML and web-authoring tools. Topics include how to page layouts, templates and links, set font styles, create tables, align images, build frames, create rollovers, work with form objects, redefine HTML with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and integrate images. Lab fee assessed.

EN166

SPEECH

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---

An introduction to public speaking. Requires oral presentations by students in a variety of public speaking situations. Emphasis is placed on diction, delivery, audience analysis, purpose and research.

EN175

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL MEDIA

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Placement above EN125

This course deals with the language and concepts of contemporary media. Students study the digital communication tools and their effect on communication and economic and social structures. Students acquire basic writing skills necessary to create messages for the multimedia environment, such as web-based and other digital formats including text, audio, still images and moving images. Upon completion of the course students will be able to write multimedia scripts, understand the nuances of writing for multimedia vs. standalone texts, and understand the limitations and advantages of multimedia as conduits for communication.

EN201/BS205

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: BS101, EN152, and EN166

This course will assist students in developing the skills needed to communicate effectively in an increasingly diverse work environment. Communication theories and skills essential for success in management, with emphasis placed on research, organization, writing, and presentation of business communications will be examined. Topics integrated throughout the course include global communication, business ethics, and cultural differences in the business environment. Included are technological applications and ethical and cross- cultural considerations in the workplace.

EN205

CREATIVE WRITING

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN151

A writing workshop for students interested in writing fiction and poetry. Students analyze published pieces to study basic techniques of storytelling and description, and apply them in their own work.

EN217

PERSUASION AND PUBLIC ISSUES

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: EN152

Students study the ways to present versions of reality by selecting and structuring information. Students analyze the nature and impact of rhetoric in public controversy. Critical analysis of the effect of speeches, debates, commentaries. Rhetorical analysis of arguments. Students explore and practice effective persuasive techniques, and create professional documents addressing a public issue.

EN227

INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: EN152

The course studies what makes a poem, a story or a play good literature. Students learn to appreciate cultural contexts, conventions of genres, innovations and skills of the writers, and to make informed value judgments about works of literature.

EN260

APPLIED GRAMMAR

(4 credit hours)

Winter/Odd YearPrerequisites: EN152

The course explores the difference between prescriptive and descriptive approaches to grammar, and introduces the structure of the English language on the level of phonetics, morphology and syntax. The students learn how the knowledge of structure can be applied to their writing, to mythic tradition.

EN271

SCIENCE FICTION

(4 credit hours)

Winter/Odd YearPrerequisites: EN152

Discusses classic and modern science fiction literature and films. Identifies the appeal of the genre, its generic features, and the social issues it addresses.

EN301

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

Sophisticated level of reading and writing. Intensive analysis of complex essays, using the ideas of one essay to explore the implications of another. Study of unusual writing techniques. Practice creating writing pieces modelled on unusual techniques of advanced writers.

EN341

AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Odd YearPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

Major works of fiction, prose and poetry by African American writers. A brief overview of the historical, social, and political context of African-American literature.

EN342

LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Even YearPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

Major works of fiction by Latin American writers. A brief overview of the historical, social, and political context of Latin American literature.

EN351

FILM ADAPTATION

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

Students will analyze the film adaptation of novels. Emphasis on film language, editing, and pacing.

EN352/DM320

DIGITAL VIDEO/AUDIO PRODUCTION

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: EN290

This course integrates digital video and audio productions. It includes a comprehensive project using all the technologies covered in EN290. Final project is an approximately twenty minute film. Lab fee assessed.

EN360

NARRATIVE AND HORROR

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

Discusses classic and modern horror literature and films. Enhances students ability to identify patterns. Identifies the appeal of the genre, generic features, and the social and psychological issues it addresses.

EN361

THE ROLE OF ROMANCE IN LITERATURE

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

Discusses classic and modern romance novels and films. Enhances students ability to identify patterns. Identifies the appeal of the genre, generic features, and the social and psychological issues it addresses.

EN362

MYSTERY AND SUSPENSE

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

Discusses classic and modern mystery and suspense novels and films. Enhances students ability to identify patterns. Identifies the appeal of the genre, generic features, and the social and psychological issues it addresses.

EN366

COMEDY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

The course explores what makes a work of literature of a film funny. What are the patterns which create a comedy? Students read and view comedic literary works and films. They explore the structure and conventions of comedy, and comedy’s role in imaginative and human life as seen through ethical, cognitive, and literary theory. Enhances students ability to identify patterns.

EN370

GROUP DYNAMICS AND TEAM BUILDING

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

Application of the principles of group dynamics to effective communication in a variety of contexts. Students examine the effects of group structure, collaboration, and decision-making on performance. Special emphasis on critical thinking and personal involvement in the group process. Students will work on a collaborative research project and will organize a symposium.

EN371

SOCIAL MEDIA IN TODAY’S WORKPLACE

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

This applications-based course provides an overview of technology tools used in the digital age. Students will learn how to create projects using new media such as Facebook and Twitter, as well as analyze the appropriate use of media choices in professional settings. The course is designed to assist students in understanding and effectively using a variety of technology tools.

EN373

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

(4 credit hours)

summerPrerequisites: EN152

A study of the communication variables in intercultural contexts including culture and meaning, nonverbal styles across cultures, culture shock and communication, and values in intercultural professional settings.

EN375/MR311

PUBLIC RELATIONS

(4 credit hours)

Winter/Even YearPrerequisites: MR201 or consent of instructor

This course emphasizes the communication and the presentation elements of the public relations function. The course introduces strategic issues and effective practices of communication between organizations and their constituencies. Includes the study of public opinion research, media relations, public communication campaigns, consumer identity, and representational ethics. Students gain practical experience in writing news releases, conducting surveys, and designing integrated campaigns. Oral and written group and individual presentations are required.

EN380

NEGOTIATION

(4 credit hours)

Spring/Even YearPrerequisites: EN152

Negotiation theory and its application to the world of work. Topics covered include negotiating in multi-party situations; challenges of representing groups whether they are corporations, class parties, or families; the effect of intra-group and inter-group negotiations, barriers to dispute resolution; and the role of third parties in complex negotiations.

EN404

STUDIES IN THE BIBLE

(4 credit hours)

Winter/Even YearPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

This course is appropriate for people of any faith (Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, atheist, Christian, Hebrew or Zoroastrian). It addresses the origins and structure of the foundational text of the three Abrahamic faiths. Who wrote the Bible? When? Where? How do we know? Explores selections from the Old and New Testament. Analysis of literary form and of the historical and cultural contexts. Discussion of sources and canon formation.

EN406

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing.

We will study seven of the greatest plays ever written. They depict the joys and ambiguities of love, the illusions of politics, the depths of hatred, and the need for forgiveness. They portray some of the greatest characters in literature in the most beautiful language in English.

EN412

MEDIA AND SOCIETY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Odd YearPrerequisites: EN152

A study of the way media shape messages; the economic, psychological, and cultural effects of media; and the interaction of media with humans.

EN433

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Even YearPrerequisites: EN260

An introduction to sociolinguistics with emphasis on the relation of language to social stratification and cohesion. Students explore the role of language as a social and political instrument.

EN440

PERSUASION AND DEBATE

(4 credit hours)

Winter/Odd YearPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing

The persuasion and debate course is designed to improve critical thinking and argumentation skills. The student will develop the ability to apply those skills in a variety of communication situations (business, legal, personal). Students will research, analyze, and develop sound arguments on various relevant issues and apply the basic principles of argumentation to various forms of debate.

EN453

GENDER AND IDENTITY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

Investigates how gender is constituted, how it changes over time, how it interacts with other cultural institutions and symbols, and considers the social and individual consequences of notions of gender and the role of gender in forming identity and structuring personal experience.

EN493

READINGS IN ENGLISH AND COMMUNICATIONS

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: Senior standing

An intensive study of a major writer or issue of current interest.

ET101

BASIC ELECTRONICS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---

Areas of study include fundamentals of atomic structure, electronic configuration, SPDF levels, charge, current, EMF, power, resistors, capacitors, inductors as active and passive elements, construction of passive elements, frequency, sweeptime, principles of various instruments such as D.C. power supply, function generator,oscilloscope and sweep generator.Introduction to AC, Electromagnetism, Motors and Generators.

ET102

BASIC ELECTRONICS WORKSHOP

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET101Corequisites: MT155

Construction of simple and complex circuits using resistors, inductors and capacitors with D.C. and A.C. power supplies Hands-on training with D.C. power supply, function generator, oscilloscope and sweep generator, Spectrum analysis, logic probe and pulsars. Building a simple motor, and dynamo.

ET106

CIRCUIT ANALYSIS

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET102, MT156Corequisites: ET107 & MT160

Volt-ampere characteristics for circuit elements; independent and dependent sources; Kirchhoff ’s laws and circuit equations; Source transformations; Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems; Millman’s theorem and superposition theorem Step response of 1st order (RC, RL) and 2nd order (RLC) circuits, Phasor analysis, impedance calculations, and computation of sinusoidal steady state responses; Instantaneous and average power, complex power, maximum power transfer, apparent and real power, power factor correction.

ET107

CIRCUIT ANALYSIS LABORATORY

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET106

Laboratory experiments in the measurement of circuit analysis. Design and implementation of circuits, such as Thevenin, Norton, Millman, and Superposition theorems, Pi-to-Star and Star- to –Pi, RC, RL, and RCL series and parallel combinations; experimental exercises in the use of laboratory instruments; voltage, current, impedance, frequency and waveform measurements; frequency and transient response.

ET108

Electrical Theory and Applications

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ET101, ET102

This course covers electrical system theory from the point of A.C. production through its distribution and use in single-phase systems. Also covered are magnetism, fusing, relays, transformers, and other A.C. components. Students analyze circuits while working with ladder diagrams and wring diagrams.

ET109

Single-Phase & Three-Phase Electrical Systems

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: Et101, ET102

The student will be able to write circuit equations for a coupled-inductor system, analyze circuits containing ideal transformers and autotransformers, analyze three-phase wye- and delta-connected balanced circuits, derive and Bode plot frequency domain transfer functions, write behavioral descriptive equations for series- and parallel-resonant circuits in the time- and frequency domains, use Fourier series techniques to analyze circuit responses to periodic signals, and derive two-port parameter descriptions for circuits.

ET110

Electrical Test Equipment, Safety, and National Electric Code(NEC)

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ET101, ET102

Students will learn safe working procedures for construction environments. Course includes an introduction to OSHA and regulations for electrical safety including lock-out/tag-out, grounding and insolation. Also covered are electrical test meters and how they are used. Familiarization with the National Electric Code(NEC) for all aspects of electrical standards.

ET140

Low-Voltage Cabling

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ET101, ET102

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills regarding the make-up, identification, selection, and applications of various types of conductors and cables used in telecommunications, security systems, and current low voltage devices such as LED. Described the tools, materials, and procedures for pulling cables through conduit and raceways, busses, and networks.

ET150

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SYSTEMS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET106Corequisites: ET151 & MT158

Areas of study include base conversions, base operations, complements, logic gates, Boolean algebra, proof by induction, SOP, POS, universal gates, combination circuits, K-maps, multiplexers, decoders, encoders, comparators, PLA, PLC, PAL, RAM and ROM.

ET151

DIGITAL SYSTEMS LABORATORY

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET150

Laboratory activities involve design, implementation and troubleshooting of SSI, MSI and LSI integrated chips with concepts introduced in ET150. Cost effectiveness, compact circuits and reliability are the principal goals while using IC’s. Intro to OPAMPS.

ET155

SOLID STATE DEVICES

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET106Corequisites: ET156 & MT160

Introduces and explains terminology, models, properties, and concepts associated with semiconductor devices. Provides detailed insight into the internal workings of the “building-block” device structures such as the pn-junction diode, Schottky diode, BJT, MOS capacitor and MOSFET. Presents information about a wide variety of other devices including solar cells, LEDs, HBTs, and modern field –effect devices. Systematically develops the analytical tools needed to solve practical device problems. Solar Cells LED and HBTs.

ET156

SOLID STATE DEVICES LABORATORY

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET155

Lab experiments include designing, testing, and fabricating HW rectifiers, FW rectifiers, biasing, BJT, UJT, MOSFETs, and small signal amplifiers. Experiments with solar cells and LEDs

ET201

Electrical Project Development and Planning

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ET101, ET102, ET140, ET202, and ET204

This capstone course requires students to create an Electrical construction plan utilizing the skills and concepts acquired through the program. Students will demonstrate project planning, cost analysis, estimating, basic design, and other concepts.

ET202

Electrical Construction – Residential

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ET101, ET102, and ET140

This course provides a particular approach to installation of residential electrical systems in common use today. Included are the most common challenges likely to be encountered by electricians. Areas covered are required outlets, circuiting, box selection, conductor identification, box make-up, load calculations, National Electric Code (NEC), and other topics related to residential wiring

ET203

FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ET155 & MT160

Types of noise, S/N ratio, frequency spectrum, block diagram of communication system and signals, Am, FM. PM, and Angle modulations, spectra Angle modulation, Frequency division, multiplexing, Sampling theory, Quantization theory, Digital line coding methods, Digital signal, Analog versus digital communications. Emphasis on engineering applications of theory to communication system.

ET204

Electrical Construction – Commercial

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ET101, ET102, and ET140

This course provides a particular approach to installation of commercial electrical systems in common use today. Included are the most common challenges likely to be encountered by electricians. Areas covered are required outlets, circuiting, box selection, conductor identification, box make-up, load calculations, National Electric Code (NEC), and other topics related to commercial wiring.

ET208

UNIX FOR ENGINEERS

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: CI209 & ET155Corequisites: MT201

Fundamental concepts of operating systems, hands-on introduction to UNIX. user interfaces, UNIX shell commands, the UNIX file system, task management, common system utilities, the UNIX programming environment, applications for circuit verification and testing, port interfaces.

ET210

Practical Project

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ET101, ET102, ET140, and ET201

This capstone course requires the student independently to create an Electrical construction plan utilizing the skills and concepts acquired through the program. Students will demonstrate project planning, cost analysis, estimating, basic design, and other concepts. Project may or may not be assigned per instructor.

ET270

DIGITAL CIRCUITS I

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: ET150 & MT201Corequisites: ET271

Tristate logic, latches, flip-flops and characteristics, counters, shift registers, sequential circuits, state table, state equation, state reduction and race problem.

ET271

DIGITAL CIRCUITS LABORATORY I

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET270

Practical lab experience with LSI, MSI chips is used to construct memory elements, counters, registers and various synchronous circuits. Micro logic software is used to simulate circuits. Labs on analyzing sequential circuits and EPROM.

ET290

MICROCONTROLLERS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: ET270 & CI216

Introduction to Embedded Systems and Microcontroller-Based Circuit Design, Instruction Set Architecture, Assembly Language Programming and General Purpose Digital I/O, Java Programming Review and the Compiler, Debugging Software and Hardware, Threads, Tasks and Simple Scheduling, Threaded Program Design, Using and Real-Time Operating Systems, Serial Communication Peripherals, Digital I/O Peripherals: T/C and PWM, Analog I/O Peripherals, Simulation Design and Debugging.

ET291

MICROCONTROLLERS LAB

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET270 & CI216

Simple arithmetic operations: Multi precision addition / subtraction / multiplication / division. Programming with control instructions: Increment / Decrement, Ascending / Descending order, Maximum / Minimum of numbers, Rotate instructions, Hex / ASCII / BCD code conversions, nterface Experiments: A/D Interfacing, D/A Interfacing, Traffic light controller, Interface Experiments: Simple experiments using 8251, 8279, 8254, Demonstration of basic instructions with 8051 Micro controller execution, Conditional jumps, looping, Calling subroutines, Stack parameter testing, Parallel port programming with 8051 using port 1 facility, Stepper motor and D / A converter, Study of Basic Digital IC’s (Verification of truth table for AND, OR, EXOR, NOT, NOR, NAND, JK FF, RS FF,D FF), Implementation of Boolean Functions, Adder / Subtractor circuits. Combination Logic; Adder, Subtractor, Code converters, Encoder and Decoder, Sequential Logic; Study of Flip-Flop, Counters) synchronous and asynchronous), Shift Registers, Clipper, Clamper, Peak detector, Timer IC application, VCO and PLL.

ET295

ELECTRONICS CAD

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET290

Introduction, CAD Tool flows, Custom VLSI and Cell Design Flow, Hierarchical Cell, Tool Setup and Execution Scripts, Typographical Conventions, Cadence DFII and ICF, Cadence Design and Framework, Starting Cadence, Composer Schematic Capture and creating New Working Library and new cell; creating the Schematic View of a Full Adder and symbol. Creating a Two-Bit adder using the Full Adder; Schematics the use Transistors; Printing Schematics and Modifying PostScript; Plot Files, Pin, and Cell Naming Verilog Simulation; Verilog Simulation of Composer Schematics; NC Verilog: Simulating a Schematic Behavioral Verilog Code in Composer; Generating a Behavioral View; Stand-alone Verilog Simulation, Timing in Verilog Simulations, Transistors Timing, Virtuoso layout Editor; Design rule checking Standard Cell Design Template; Spectrum Analog Simulator, Cell Characterization, Verilog Synthesis; Abstract Generation, Encounter GUI; Chip Assembly, Design Practice.

ET300

FILTER DESIGN

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET216 & MT203Corequisites: ET301

Solution to the filtering approximation problem via Butterworth, and Chebyshev, transfer function scaling and type transformations. Effects of A/D and D/A conversion, digital filter design methods, active filter design using operational amplifiers, operation and design of switched capacitor filters, active filter design using operational amplifiers, operation and design of switched capacitor filters. Single supply Op-Amp.

ET301

FILTER DESIGN LABORATORY

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET300

Laboratory experiments in the design, synthesis and testing of filter circuits involving Nth order VCVS, multi-stage circuits, notch filters and single source are conducted. Frequency response experiment.

ET303

DIGITAL COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING I

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: ET203Corequisites: MT201

Introduction to analog communication systems, signals and spectra, electromagnetic spectrum and its usage, communication channels and propagation characteristics, amplitude modulation, a nd demodulation - spectra, circuits and systems, frequency modulation/demodulation, frequency division multiplexing, radio transmitters and receivers, sampling theory, pulse modulation and demodulation spectra, circuits & systems, circuit noise, performance of analogue communication systems in AWGN and fading channels.

ET315

INTEGRATED CIRCUITS

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET300 & MT201Corequisites: ET316

Analysis, design and fabrication of silicon bipolar and MOSFET monolithic integrated circuits. Consideration of amplifier circuit design and fabrication techniques. Integrated operational amplifiers with different amplifiers, current sources, active loads, and voltage references, Design of IC analog circuit building blocks.

ET316

INTEGRATED CIRCUITS LABORTORY

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET315

Circuit simulation using Spice-2 is strongly emphasized while designing and verifying integrated circuit layout, fabrication techniques and building monolithic integrated circuits.

ET320

LASER FUNDAMENTALS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ET155 & MT201

Introduction to lasers, energy states and gain, the Fabry-Perot Etalon, transverse mode properties, gain saturation, transient processes. Introduction to nonlinear optics, supportive technologies, design of laser systems, conventional gas lasers, conventional solid-state lasers, transition metal solid-state lasers, and other major commercial lasers.

ET330

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS I

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: ET155 & MT202

Signal sources, RF power amplifier fundamentals, high power RF amplifiers, impedance matching, general aspects of industrial standards, protocols, limitations, and applications.

ET364

RF CIRCUIT DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS II

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET330 & MT202

Interconnecting networks, network properties and applications, scattering parameters, basic resonator and filter configurations, special filter, realizations. Filter implementation, coupled Filter semiconductor basics, RF diodes, bipolar- junction transistor. RF field effect transistors, high electron mobility, transistors, Diode models, transistor models, measurement of active devices, scattering parameter device characterization.

ET370

DIGITAL CIRCUITS II

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: ET270 & MT203Corequisites: ET371

Fault analysis, testing, fault detection, fault masking, error correction codes, D/A converter circuitry, DAC specification, DAC application, A/D converter circuitry, digital RAMP and A/D converter.

ET371

DIGITAL CIRCUITS LABORATORY II

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET370

Lab projects involving fault detection, D/A circuits, A/D circuits and fault masking are demonstrated.

ET375

ENVIRONMENT ELECTRONICS DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET155 & MT201

Understanding environment, analysis, different types of energy, system design, power electronics, energy calculations, conservation of energy, alternate fuels and practical approach, storing energy.

ET378

DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ET364 & MT430Corequisites: ET379

Discrete time signals and systems and properties, analysis of discrete time systems, frequency response, Z-transform and properties, stability and complete response, structures for discrete time systems, properties of analog filters and frequency transformations, design of finite impulse response digital filters, design of infinite impulse response, digital filters, discrete fourier transform and fast fourier transform algorithm and applications.

ET379

DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING LABORATORY

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET378

Practical lab experiments are conducted to various frequency response of digital and analog filters. Micro logic software is used to simulate circuits.

ET403

DIGITAL COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING II

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: ET303 & MT430

Classification of signals and systems, orthogonal functions, fourier series, fourier transform, Spectra and filtering, sampling theory, Nyquist theorem, random processes, autocorrelation, power spectrum, systems with random input/output, quantization, compression, and PCM, elements of compression, Huffman coding, elements of quantization theory, pulse code modulation (PCM) and variations, Rate/bandwidth calculations in communication systems, Communication over AWGN channels, signals and noise, Eb/No, receiver structure, demodulation and detection, correlation receiver and matched filter, and MFSK, coherent and non-coherent detection, communication over band-limited AWGN channel, elements of coding.

ET420

FIBER OPTICS

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: ET378 & MT202

Optical energy, optical fibers, fiber optic light sources, fiber optic transmitters and receivers and fiber optic systems are covered. Spectroscope, Diffraction Grating, Polarization of light.

ET430

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS II

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: ET330 & MT203

Introduction to transmission lines, basic understanding of electrical grid, Smith charts, power measurement and control, troubleshooting and maintenance of RF power systems in modern electronics communications, industrial applications of RF Power.

ET475

ENVIRONMENT ELECTRONICS DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS II

(4 credit hours)

Fall/SpringPrerequisites: ET375 & MT202

Study of solar energy, solar panels, conversion factors, losses, invertors, DC and AC signals, storing and conversion ratio, reflectors, optics and energy.

ET485

EMBEDDED DESIGN

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: ET150 & MT203Corequisites: ET486

Introduction to CPU architecture, instruction Set, QwikFlash target Board, program development, (P1 Template), structured assembly preprocessor, alphanumeric liquid-crystal displays (P2 Template), rotary pulse generators, interrupts and interrupt timing, analog-to- digital conversion, I/O pin considerations.

ET486

EMBEDDED TECHNOLOGY LAB

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---Corequisites: ET485

Simple arithmetic operations: Multi precision addition / subtraction / multiplication / division. Programming with control instructions: Increment / Decrement, Ascending / Descending order for Drone; Maximum / minimum of numbers, rotate instructions Hex / ASCII / BCD code conversions for speed control; Interface Experiments: A/D Interfacing, D/A Interfacing; Interface Experiments: Simple experiments using 8251, 8279, 8254; Demonstration of basic instructions with 8051 Micro controller execution; Conditional jumps, looping, Calling subroutines; Stack parameter testing; Parallel port programming with 8051 using port 1 facility; Stepper motor and D / A converter; Study of Basic Digital IC’s (Verification of truth table for AND, OR, EXOR, NOT, NOR, NAND, JK, FF, RS FF,D FF); Implementation of Boolean Functions, Adder / Subtractor circuits. Combination Logic; Adder, Subtractor, Code converters, Encoder and Decoder; Sequential Logic; Study of Flip-Flop, Counters) synchronous and asynchronous), Shift Registers for Drone; Clipper, Clamper, Peak detector, Timer IC application, VCO and PLL.

ET492

SENIOR PROJECT

(4 to 8 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: Senior standing or consent of Instructor

Topics for the senior project may involve analog circuits, communication, digital or network. Students are encouraged to design, implement and verify circuits based on an innovative and practical approach.

FN201

PRINCIPLES OF CORPORATE FINANCE

(4 credit hours)

Winter/SpringPrerequisites: BS101

An overview of basic concepts, principles, and recent innovations in financial management. Topics covered will include risk and return, valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure and cost of capital, dividend policy, financial planning, international financial management and corporate restructuring. Current events related to corporate finance will be addressed.

FN205

PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING

(4 credit hours)

Fall/WinterPrerequisites: BS101

This course includes basics of personal financial planning for different objectives, based upon the risk tolerance and financial position of the individual investor. Portfolio planning and asset allocation, retirement planning, housing and its financing, estate planning, and elder issues are included. Students will gain an understanding of personal financial planning and develop the skills necessary to make informed decisions about personal finance. Information related to the CFP (Certified Financial Planner) examination will be presented.

FN302

THE STOCK MARKET AND INVESTMENTS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: FN201 or consent of the Program Director

Introduction to securities markets and how they function. This course covers the interpretation of market changes, capital flow, and factors influencing stock market prices. Strategies and theories of investing are studied using various analytical tools and sources of investment information. Case studies and stock market games are used to simulate real-life scenarios. Special attention is given to investing in difficult and everchanging economic conditions. The role of ethics in stock trading is also a topic of discussion.

FN320

MONEY AND BANKING

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: BS101

This course addresses classical and contemporary issues in the thMotion in one, two and three dimensions, kinematics equations and problem-solving, Newton’s laws and applications, work, power, and energy, impulse, momentum, center of mass, circular motion, gravity, and solids and fluids are considered. Heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, thermal properties and processes, heat calculations and production of energy through solar panels, adiabatic and isothermal properties of alternate fuel source are also discussed. Term paper required.eory of money, banking, and financial institutions. Topics covered include the gold standard, the structure of central banks and the Federal Reserve system, theories of money demand and money supply, the relationship between money supply and overall economic activity, and the theoretical and practical aspects of monetary policy. Current topics related to the economy will be discussed.

FN323

COMMERCIAL BANKING

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: FN201 or consent of the Program Director

A comprehensive study of commercial banking and its role in the economy. This course emphasizes the practical application of economic principles as they relate to bank management and regulatory policy. Topics include banking history and regulation, consumer and commercial credit analysis, asset and liability management, risk management, loan policy, and money management services. Current trends such as bailouts, on-line banking, and internationalization will also be addressed.

FN333

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ANALYSIS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: AC101, FN201 or FN205, or consent of the Program Director

This course, designed to prepare students to effectively interpret and analyze financial statements, explores financial reporting topics in depth. This course will cover the ethical challenges faced relative to financial statement analysis and stock analysis. statement analysis.

FN341

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: FN201 or FN205 or consent of the Program Director

This course will introduce students to global financial markets. Emphasis is placed on operations of multinational firms and foreign exchange markets. Topics include international financial markets, international banking, currency derivative markets, Euromarkets, risk management, and investment decisions in the global marketplace. The current state of international banking will also be discussed.

FN350

REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: FN201 or FN205 or consent of the Program Director

This course covers finance related to residential and commercial real estate. The material covered will explore functions of commercial banks and other financial institutions that provide funding for real estate projects, as well as direct entry into the real estate industry. Financial analysis of commercial real estate projects will be covered.

FR101

ELEMENTARY FRENCH I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: ---

An aural-oral approach to the French language. Pronunciation and fundamental grammatical principles are introduced through drill and basic language. Special emphasis is placed on skills of listening and speaking followed by practice in reading and writing.

FR102

ELEMENTARY FRENCH II

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: FR101 or consent of instructor

A continuation of FR101.

FR103

ELEMENTARY FRENCH III

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: FR102 or consent of instructor

A continuation of FR102.

FR201

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: FR103, its equivalent or consent of instructor

A course for students who have completed one year of French; review of grammar with emphasis on the irregular verb and syntax, practice in reading, composition and conversation based on matters relating to French-speaking peoples and cultures.

FR202

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: FR201, its equivalent or consent of instructor

A continuation of FR201.

FR203

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH III

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: FR202, its equivalent or consent of instructor

A continuation of FR202.

HC200

INTRODUCTION TO HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT

( credit hours)

---

This is a survey course in healthcare management covering the basic functions of managing and leading in a health care environment. Topics such as accounting, budgeting, human resource management and information systems will be covered.

HC310

Accounting and Budgeting in the Healthcare Management Environment.

( credit hours)

---

The course will focus initially on the conceptual framework of basic accounting techniques such as the preparation of financial reports, annual and capital budgeting, cost accounting and analysis of financial statements. It will also discuss in detail the role of budgeting at various levels throughout the organization. This course will prepare the student to understand the nuance of the annual report from a non- accounting management perspective.

HC320

CURRENT ISSUES IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT

( credit hours)

---

This course will cover current issues in the local and national healthcare landscape. It will address the matters that affect the ever changing health care environment on the patient, practitioner and health care manager. Professionals in a specific field will be invited to share current topics or significant medical research that is new and cutting edge in order to bring pertinent relevance to the students other coursework.

HC330

HEALTHCARE FINANCE AND REIMBURSEMENT ISSUES

( credit hours)

---

Current topics related to the ever changing finance and reimbursement process in today’s complex healthcare environment. A different current topic will be covered and discussed in detail as necessary.

HC340

HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS

( credit hours)

---

This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of health care delivery systems; the health information profession; the definition and the purpose of the medical record; the systems and processes for collecting, maintaining and disseminating health information; numbering, retention and storage of medical information; forms control and design; indexes and registers; release of patient information, security, privacy, confidentiality, and ethical issues; documentation requirements; regulatory requirements of healthcare organization, accrediting and licensing agencies, and computerized information management systems utilized by health information management departments.

HC350/MN312

HEALTHCARE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

( credit hours)

This course will present relevant and current human resource implications to practitioners, consultants and other managerial professionals in various healthcare settings. This unique course satisfies the continuous need for current, topical information on healthcare management in the ever-changing context of the healthcare industry, including a thorough discussion of healthcare reform's impact on the HR function. Issues specifically related to ethical matters and diversity in the healthcare environment will be presented.

HC400

INTERNSHIP IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT

( credit hours)

Students apply what they have learned in their academic programs to the workplace under the supervision of both the employer and the University. Cooperative education objectives are particularized in accordance with the demands of the healthcare workplace.

HM101

HUMANITIES I

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: ---

An analysis of the artistic and philosophical creations of a specific culture and the relationships of those creations to that culture’s historical situation, social institutions, and technological capabilities.

HM102

HUMANITIES II

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: PLACEMENT ABOVE EN123

An analysis of how ideas develop as they pass from one culture to another, adapting to changing world views and different artistic media in the process.

HM103

HUMANITIES III

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: PLACEMENT ABOVE EN123

An analysis of one contemporary issue as it is presented in both discursive and artistic form with particular emphasis on its historical origin and the languages and ideologies through which it is characteristically represented.

HM111

INTRODUCTION TO ART

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: ---

Analysis of the visual arts such as painting, drawing and contemporary visual media, with emphasis both on composition and cultural and social influences.

HM120

INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: ---

Study of music fundamentals, rhythmic structure, and form, together with listening lessons to illustrate different forms of music.

HM149

INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: placement above 125

Students watch and discuss outstanding movies. This course will focus primarily on a survey of genres, directors, aesthetics, and cultural relevance. Students discuss the nature of art and analyze the tools used to achieve the director’s purpose.

HM210

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

A survey of the fundamental questions about self, society, and the universe. Focus is on metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, theories of knowledge, as well as philosophical concepts and methodologies.

HM211

ETHICS AND SOCIETY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

A study of contemporary moral standards and their relationship to society. Emphasis is on discussions concerning modern ethical systems as they influence personal, professional, and public conduct. Topics include the nature of the human personality with its rights and duties, the individual’s relation to the family and society, and the nature of social justice.

HM230

MYTHOLOGIES OF THE WORLD

(4 credit hours)

Winter/Even YearPrerequisites: placement above 125

Study of the relation between myths and the cultures that create them.Contemporary fiction influenced by the Myths from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

HM279

EAST-WEST SIGNATURE COURSE

(4 credit hours)

Fall/Winter/SpringPrerequisites: EN157 and sophomore standing.

An interdisciplinary examination of the challenges and opportunities created by the contact of different cultural groups. Required for all graduating students.

HM280

RESEARCH IN THE LIBERAL ARTS

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: EN152

Students will create a comprehensive project that synthesizes the concepts learned throughout their associate of arts degree in the Liberal Arts. This course serves as the capstone course of the AA in Liberal Arts degree and should be taken in the last quarter of their pursuit of that degree.

HM491 Fall

SENIOR SEMINAR

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: Senior standing

Capstone course to East-West University’s bachelor’s degree general education requirement. Students explore the relationship between technology and humanity. Course requires close textual explications, class presentations, and a major research project. Required for all graduating seniors.

HS119

WORLD HISTORY

(4 credit hours)

SummerPrerequisites: EN121 or placement

An introduction to the concept, definition, and applicability of the terms history and world history and an examination of select historical developments, cross-cultural contacts, and political, social and cultural events of modern civilizations.

HS122

UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1865

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: EN121 or placement

A historical survey of the social, economic, political and intellectual development of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present time.

HS231

AFRICAN HISTORY

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Sophomore standing

A survey of African civilization from pre- colonial through the modern period of emerging independent nations. Select countries will be used to illustrate the varying patterns of colonialism and nation building in Africa.

HS241

SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION

(4 credit hours)

FallPrerequisites: Sophomore standing

A survey of the development of Latin American civilization from its origins to the present time. The course gives an overview of the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments of Latin America with emphasis on the traditions of indigenous people, the nature and impact of European intrusions, colonial institutions, evolution of the modern nation states, and current challenges.

HS251

SURVEY OF MIDDLE EASTERN CIVILIZATION

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: Sophomore standing

A survey of the development of Middle Eastern civilization from its origins to the present time. This course gives an overview of the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments of the Middle East with emphasis on the traditions of indigenous people, their cultural and political impact on regional and world history, imperial expansions and invasions, evolution of the modern states and movements, and current challenges.

HS326

CONTEMPORARY AMERICA

(4 credit hours)

WinterPrerequisites: One history course or PL101 & Junior standing

A description and critical analysis of contemporary America, including social, cultural, economic, intellectual and political conditions of the United States since 1945.

HS336

AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY

(4 credit hours)

SummerPrerequisites: Junior standing

A survey of African-American history from its African background until modern times. The evolution and legacy of slavery, the significance of Reconstruction and its opposition, the rise of discrimination, self- help organizing by African-Americans, two World Wars and major northward migrations, and the civil rights and nationalist movements will be analyzed.

HS491

TOWARDS A GLOBAL COMMUNITY

(4 credit hours)

SpringPrerequisites: One history course & Junior standing

A description, analysis and interpretation of 20th century world history with emphasis on a global perspective. This course focuses on the interaction and interdependence of contemporary civilizations and regions, inter-and intra-cultural tensions, the emergence of a global society confronted with demographic, technological, environmental, and ideological challenges with emphasis on the time since 1945.

HS493

READINGS IN HISTORY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: 12 hours in History, Senior standing and consent of instructor

Directed intensive reading with focus on a select topic. May be repeated once for credit.

HS494

TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY

(4 credit hours)

As NeededPrerequisites: One 300 level course in history and consent of instructor

Critical study of a select topic concerning specific aspects of American history. Emphasis will be placed on the use of primary sources. The topics will vary. May be repeated once for credit.

IS111

INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM AND MUSLIM CIVILIZATION

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: ---Corequisites: EN151

An interdisciplinary course on religions of man and civilization with special reference to Islam; philosophical issues of reality, knowledge and values; Islamic system of beliefs, worships and values derived from the Quran and Sunnah; the nature of Muslim society and its social, political and economic dimensions; a review of Muslim history since 610 CE; Muslim contributions to civilization, culture, sciences and the arts; and the issues and concerns of Muslims of the modern era.

IS112

KNOWLEDGE AND HUMANITY: THE ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVE

(4 credit hours)

---Prerequisites: EN151

A general survey of the important areas of knowledge impacting human life. Preliminary facts, concepts, theories and generalizations concerning matter and energy, the earth, life on earth, human life, human society, art, technology, religion and history are reviewed. Basic beliefs and commandments of Islam about knowledge and humanity are discussed. The course is intended to help students develop their own self-concept, worldview and philosophy of life and understand the perennial questions of why some communities and nations rise and others fall in various time-space contexts and what role religion plays in this process.